Luminous ambience, quantitative/qualitative data and subjective response

This paper presents several years of research in luminous ambience in daylighting. It began with works on the relationship between intuitive and quantitative approaches for the understanding of luminous ambience. We collected quantitative data from measurements of illuminance levels on glazed and opaque surfaces in interior spaces.

From these measures we could build an interpretation related to the luminous ambience. They were compared to what was expressed by interviewed subjects in these spaces or to intentions expressed by the architect during the design when available.
At the end of this work, a first issue was: how could we explain that comfort and pleasantness of an ambience may often be conflicting? We investigated this question and showed that comfort is not sufficient to express the quality of a luminous ambience and that some degree of “discomfort” may be needed by individuals to feel an ambience as pleasant.

Confronted to the variety of answers given by people about luminous ambience, we tried to understand how subjective responses to a luminous ambience relate to the dimensions of personality. As this particular point of view seemed to have seldom been investigated, we decided to start a project specifically focused on this subject. The purpose of this paper is therefore to sum up this line of research, from quantitative measurements to dimensions of personality.

Luminous ambience, quantitative/qualitative data and subjective response